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October-November 2021

Virtual - Live Zoom Sessions 

This four-week program, with two three-hour days per week, offers knowledge and experience to help participants become more effective tribal finance/accounting professionals and leaders. Interact with and learn from other tribal finance/accounting professionals throughout the state and beyond. Participants can receive up to 25 hours of CPE credit.

 

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Registration Information

Registration: $1,500

 

Registration includes digital instruction, materials and certificates. One copy of the “Financial Reporting and Information Guide for Tribal Governments, and Their Enterprises” (Orange Book) as published by the Native American Financial Officers Association will be distributed as part of the registration fee to each participant.

 

Participants can earn up to 25 hours of CPE credit (2 hours of auditing, 2 hours of behavioral ethics, 2 hours of specialized knowledge, 1.5 hours of regulatory ethics, 4.5 hours of accounting, 3 hours of accounting, governmental, 1 hour of information technology, and 9 hours of finance).

 

The Center for Executive and Professional Development, Oklahoma State University, is registered with the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a sponsor of continuing professional education on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors. State boards of accountancy have final authority on the acceptance of individual courses for CPE credit. Complaints regarding registered sponsors may be submitted to the National Registry of CPE Sponsors through its website: www.nasbaregistry.org.

 

Who Should Attend?

 

Digital badges

 

  • Earn a Digital Badge

    Participants are eligible to receive the OSU Intermediate Finance and Accounting Digital Badge, which requires program and project completion to be added to your portfolio. The badge will note the sessions covered and serve as a validation of accomplishments, skills and quality you have learned throughout this program. In order to receive a certificate of completion, the participant must attend at least 90 percent of the program.

  • Optional Digital Badge Project to Benefit Your Tribe:

    For applicability of learned material in the intermediate program, participants are encouraged to work with their employer to complete a project and case analysis of a financial/accounting issue to benefit their tribe/organization. Participants may also find a case study of another tribe’s financial challenges and seek solutions for that case. 

     

    The project will be outlined as follows:

    1. Identify key issues and problems;
    2. Establish objectives;
    3. Formulate alternatives for resolving the issues; and
    4. Give a recommendation on the best solution.

    A 30-minute session is scheduled each evening for participants to brainstorm ideas regarding this project with the help of an industry expert. This project highlights the practices learned during this program, which in turn will benefit the participant’s tribe or organization. Projects are due by Nov. 19, 2020. Upon the satisfactory completion of the project, the participant will be sent a digital badge, which the individual can add to their LinkedIn page, other social media options and/or resume.

 

OSU Tribal Finance and Accounting Institute/Academy Options (in order):

  • Agenda 

    Week 1

    October 12

    9 a.m.–12 p.m.

    Financial Statement and Interpreting Data

    Nancy Titus-Piersma, Oklahoma State University

    Eli McIntosh, Oklahoma Tribal Finance Consortium

    Theme: Importance of Financial Data

    CPE: Technical, Finance

     

    Developing a Toolkit to Help Financial Leaders to Educate/Teach Non-Financial Leaders

    Nancy Titus-Piersma, Oklahoma State University

    Eli McIntosh, Oklahoma Tribal Finance Consortium

    Theme: Importance of Financial Data

    CPE: Technical, Finance


    October 14

    8:30 a.m.12:45 p.m.

    OSU Tribal Finance and Accounting Conference

    Moderator: Eli McIntosh, Oklahoma Tribal Finance Consortium

     

    Project Brainstorming

    Baker Tilley Virchow Krause, LLP

     

    Week 2

    October 19

    9 a.m.12 p.m.

    Using Financial Data in Accounting

    David Carter, Oklahoma State University & Joel Haaser, BKD

    Theme: Importance of Financial Data

    CPE: Technical, Finance

     

    October 21

    9 a.m.12:30 p.m.

    Process Improvements for the Finance and Accounting Department

    Audrey Gramling, Oklahoma State University & Joel Haaser, BKD

    Theme: Process & Financial Statements

    CPE: Technical, Finance

     

    Project Brainstorming

    Baker Tilley Virchow Krause, LLP

     

    Week 3

    November 2

    9 a.m.–12 p.m.

    Principles and Standards - Tribal Governmental Accounting

    Hattie Mitchell, REDW

    Theme: Accounting & Taxes

    CPE: Technical, Finance

     

    November 4

    9 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

    Internal Controls, Managing and Budgeting of Tax Revenues

    Hattie Mitchell, REDW

    Theme: Accounting & Taxes

    CPE: Technical, Accounting

     

    Tribal Revenue Taxes and Payments

    Hattie Mitchell, REDW

    Theme: Accounting & Taxes

    CPE: Technical, Ethics

     

    Project Brainstorming

    Baker Tilley Virchow Krause, LLP

     

    Week 4

    November 9

    9 a.m.–12 p.m.

    Fraud Prevention and Detection

    Ryan Luetkemeyer, Moss Adams

    Theme: Finance Investments & Auditing

    CPE: Ethics

     

    How to Create a Cashflow Statement

    Ryan Luetkemeyer, Moss Adams

    Theme: Finance Investments & Auditing

    CPE: Special Knowledge

     

    Fair Value Accounting of Investments

    Ryan Luetkemeyer, Moss Adams

    Theme: Finance Investments & Auditing

    CPE: Special Knowledge

     

    November 10

    9 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

    Ethics

    Rachel Cox, Oklahoma State University

    Theme: Finance Investments & Auditing

    CPE: Ethics

     

    Introduction to Tribal Investments & Treasury Management

    Lars Landrie, Moss Adams

    Theme: Finance Investments & Auditing

    CPE: Technical, Auditing

     

    Project Brainstorming

    Baker Tilley Virchow Krause, LLP

  • Session Descriptions and Learning Objectives

    Oct. 22 | Financial Statements and Interpreting Data

    What does a balance sheet tell us? Should we look at more than one? What about an income statement? How is that different from a cash flow statement? How do they fit together? How can I identify good and bad trends? What are some key indicators I should watch closely? There is a story in each statement. Can you tell the story? Let’s learn how.

     

    Attendees will:

    • Understand the information presented on financial statements.
    • Learn to analyze the data on financial statements. 

    Oct. 22 | Developing a Toolkit to Help Financial Leaders to Educate/Teach Non-Financial Leaders

    Tribal leaders shoulder a lot of responsibility, but it is your job to ensure they understand the strengths, weaknesses and unfolding trends in the tribe’s financial health. We will discuss engaging ways to accomplish this.

     

    Attendees will:

    • Learn to describe the goal of the financial manager.
    • Understand the implications for decision-making. 

    Oct. 27 | Using Financial Data in Accounting

    This session addresses what you may wish to report to your tribe’s leadership including major operating events, progress toward budget goals, cash needed to fund government, strategic plans, financial obligations and accountability.

     

    Attendees will:

    • Understand the unique characteristics between finance and accounting matters.
    • Identify and analyze common financial ratios and scenarios.
    • Identify and understand the accounting standards that require the use of certain financial ratios.

    Oct. 29 | Process Improvement for the Finance and Accounting Department

    The objective of this session is to provide participants with a principles-based framework that will enable their organizations to effectively and efficiently develop and maintain a system of internal control that will help them achieve their objectives related to financial reporting. Those objectives may encompass reliability, timeliness, transparency, or other attributes as needed by their organizations. Achieving these objectives will help participants improve their organizations in meaningful ways. Participants will be able to help their organizations strengthen controls and bolster confidence in meeting their reporting objectives.

     

    Attendees will:

    • Describe what is meant by internal control over financial reporting and why it is important.
    • Identify and analyze risks to reliable financial reporting.
    • Develop and manage appropriate responses to risks to reliable financial reporting.

    Nov. 10 | Principles and Standards—Tribal Governmental Accounting

    In this session, we will discuss Tribal government financial reporting, including disclosures for debt, capital assets, investments, fiduciary activities, governmental revenue and expenditure recognition, in accordance with GASB standards to help meet the standards of tribal governmental accounting and financial reporting.

     

    GASB standards include accounting and disclosure requirements that will be reviewed for:

    • Debt
    • Capital assets
    • Investments
    • Fiduciary funds
    • Revenue recognition, government
    • Expenditure recognition, government

    Nov. 12 | Internal Controls, Managing & Budgeting of Tax Revenues

    Tax revenues are essential to support governmental functions that provide for tribal investments in education, law enforcement, health care and others that support their communities. This session will address internal controls and budgeting and managing tax revenues.

     

    Attendees will:

    • Discuss accounting recognition for taxes from GASB standards.
    • Learn the use of tax revenues and accounting per GASB standards.
    • Review budgeting and monitoring of tax revenues and uses.
    • Examine internal controls for administering tax revenue programs. 

    Nov. 12 | Tribal Revenues Taxes and Payments

    There is often confusion in how taxes work in Indian Country. This session focuses on a brief overview of taxes that may be collected by tribal governments, and the taxes they are required to pay, and review state-revenue sharing agreements that may occur. 

      

    Attendees will:

    • Identify the types of tax revenues that governments assess, and the typical tax revenues they may enact.
    • Review the types of federal taxes and some state taxes that tribes are required to pay, including the IRS published guidance for Tribes.
    • Discuss what state/tribe tax revenue sharing agreements are and review a couple of examples of such agreements. 

    Nov. 12 | Cash Flow Pro Forma Statement

    Cash flow describes the net amount of cash from operations and may represent revenues to payments. The pro forma statement can assist a tribe by adjusting a financial report to show effects of an anticipated change such as the occurrence of additional debt to see what effect it might have on debt service requirements.

     

    Attendees will:

    • Understand the importance of utilizing a cash flow pro forma statement during the budgeting process.
    • Learn how to estimate cash inflows and outflows to plan for future financing and investing opportunities.
    • Understand the importance of properly managing cash flows, updating projections and communicating unfavorable variances to those charged with governance.

    Nov. 17 | Fair Value Accounting of Investments

    GASB statements provide guidance on fair value measurement for state, local and tribal governments. Understanding how investments are affected, the key items of fair value, comprehending valuation techniques and the additional disclosures financial statement is important.

     

    Attendees will:

    • Understand key provisions for reporting investments at fair value in GASBS 72 Fair Value Measurement and Application and GASBS 90 Majority Equity Interests.
    • Learn how to read and understand the disclosure requirements for investments.
    • Understand the financial reporting requirements for your Tribe’s investments and when to reach out to third parties for independent valuations.

    Nov. 17 | Fraud Prevention and Detection

    Fraud risk is a significant issue that affects both tribes and members. Intolerance of fraud from the top with a clear code of conduct, internal controls, detailed and current accounting records, segregation of duties and a hotline all can be helpful to make a difference in fraud detection and prevention.

     

    Attendees will:

    • Understand key risks of fraud that impacts Tribal governments and how to be prepared.
    • Discuss examples of fraud and what safeguards could have been implemented to mitigate the risk.
    • Understand the difference between key internal controls that prevent and detect fraud versus accounting processes that add little value.

    Nov. 19 | Ethics

    Tribal members should maintain the highest standards which are affected by honesty, impartiality, integrity and fairness. Having a stated policy of ethics is important to tribes to help guide their members, but effective ethical leadership goes beyond policy development. In this session, we will discuss how our ethical values are under pressure from a variety of different sources, and learn some practical steps to help enhance ethical compliance within a tribe.

     

    Attendees will:

    • Learn about how effective tribal governance determines the extent of deviation from ethical principles.
    • Learn about how there is extraordinary pressure that people face every day and the importance of effective internal controls within a tribe.
    • Discuss ethics program orientation types that can be adopted by a tribe and why some are more effective than others.

    Nov. 19 | Introduction to Tribal Investments and Treasury Management

    This session addresses working with banks and investment advisors and their policies to better understand the unique tribal organization’s opportunities and objectives. There is recognition that projects dealing with investments and financing range from large to small and that there are particular issues of tribal culture, law and sovereignty. This introductory session will address working with investment advisors, the different types and the policies and procedures the Tribe should have in place for their investment program. We will discuss an analysis of Treasury Management within the overall investment structure.

     

    Attendees will:

    • Learn the basics of investment asset classes and portfolio asset classes.
    • Learn portfolio allocation and construction.
    • Learn how to create an Investment Policy Statement.
    • Examine short-term vs. long-term investment strategies.
  • Advisory Board

    LaDonna Sinning, Shareholder, Arledge & Associates, P.C.

    Joel Laubenstein, Principal, Baker Tilly US, LLP

    Jay Hannah, Executive Vice President, Financial Services, BancFirst

    Joel Haaser, Managing Director, BKD CPA's

    Alex Hontos, Attorney, Dorsey & Whitney, LLP

    Tralynna Scott, Treasurer, Cherokee Nation

    Mike Wood, Accounting Lead, Workforce Development, Chickasaw Nation

    Martin Tucker, Chief Financial Officer, Choctaw Nation

    Mary Chisholm, Chief Financial Officer, Citizen Potawatomi Nation

    James Nichols, Attorney, The Jacobson Law Group

    Kirke Kickingbird, Of Counsel, Hobbs Straus Dean & Walker LLP

    Nicole Elliott, Partner, Holland & Knight LLP

    Eli McIntosh, Chairman, Oklahoma Tribal Finance Consortium and Member, Muscogee (Creek) Nation

    Emery Real Bird, Financial Management Policy Specialist, NAFOA

    Tasha Fox, Controller, Osage Nation

    W. Harrison Perry, Finance Director, Pawnee Nation

    Hattie Mitchell, Senior Manager, Tribal Consultant, REDW

    Kyle Coody, Treasurer, Seminole Nation

    Lacey Horn, Chairwoman, Treasury Tribal Advisory Committee

    Lindsay Robertson, Faculty Director, Center for the Study of American Indian Law and Policy, University of Oklahoma

     

    OSU Representatives - Rachel Domnick, Ken Eastman, Audrey Gramling, Lindsey Ray, George Krull, Betty Simkins, Julie Weathers

  • Program policies

    If a participant would like to cancel her/his registration less than 10 days prior to the program, you are welcome to send a substitute. A refund is available given notification no later than 11 days prior to the program. If you are cancelling your registration or transferring your registration to a colleague, please contact the OSU Center for Executive and Professional Development at 405-744-5208 or cepd@okstate.edu. CEPD will send you an email confirming your cancellation and refund if applicable.

     

    For more information regarding administrative policies such as complaints, please contact the assistant program manager, Lindsey Ray at 405-744-5208 or lindssk@okstate.edu.

     

    The program content is appropriate for mid-level employees in tribal finance and accounting. For CPE purposes, the knowledge level of the course is "intermediate". The prerequisite education/experience is to have attended the introductory tribal finance and accounting certificate programs or have a basic understanding of tribal finance and accounting. A pre-test will be shared with program participants by the program administratory after registration and prior to attendance.

     

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